Graham Sigurdson

Review: On Sneaking

Jon Iñaki’s comic outlines their philosophy and tips to avoid detection. You must avoid lures that lead you into traps. You must unmesh yourself from the distortions that have so far distracted you from your path.

Review: Spread Love Comix

More so than the numerous instances of porking and bodily fluids flying about, the passion of each of the contributors to Spread Love is clear. There’s a lot of passion on full display and I’m not just talking about the smut!

Review: Greater Power: A Vince McMahon Zine

Speaking as something of a lapsed wrestling fan, Greater Power makes a compelling case for once again investing oneself in the strange, strange world of sports entertainment.

Review: Mario 69

Mario 69 is part of multidisciplinary artist Jon Clark, a series of faux home media covers that each express ‘cursed’ feelings in their own way. Here, a ‘lost’ Super Mario game through lay-outs of the various enemies, characters and girlfriends.

Review: Run Wolf Run

Run Wolf Run is a well done comic-and printed in nice risograph package to boot, but does that make it worth howling over?

Review: Flummoxtown

Yawn Temisev’s comic collection left me more with a feeling of intrigue than it did any truly spurring positive or negative reaction. Maybe that’s a good quality in and of itself.

Review: The Squire’s Reunion

Austin MacDonald’s colour choices give the pages of Squire’s Reunion a sense of foreboding. Houghton’s writing complements this. To make a recent reference for fans of swords, it’s as though the petite protagonist of Ranking of Kings popped up in Elden Ring.

Review: Considerations

In the grand Oulipo tradition, Considerations sees Montreal’s Fortner Anderson undertake a constrained writing project: 1,000 numbered sentences, each with only one verb. Treat it like a daily Far Side calendar, serving yourself to a gag or observation when you feel like it.

Review: How To Say Hello

Max Morris’ Gary Panter-esque edu-comic should resolve all of your greeting related problems in the post-lockdown world.

Review: Delightful Garden

An anthology consisting of pieces inspired by Hieronymous Bosch’s delirious triptych, Delightful Garden is a heavenly sight.

Review: Hyperbolic Trajectories

Outer space, as both a place and a concept, holds a great deal of significance for each of the artists in this anthology. Characters reflect on lost possibilities; moments of intimacy or insecurity, including Soviet space dog Laika.

Review: Your Very Own

Through erasure, removal and additions, John Nyman create their own rendition of a 1985 choose your own adventure novel. The narratives found through their erasure is one that supplants the somewhat stereotypical and white patriarchal norms that hang over many 80s Americana quests.