Features

Zines Take TikTok

When Bre Upton first joined TikTok it was simply as a means to curb quarantine-born boredom. Now her tutorials on zine making have over six million views. How 'Zinetok' is uniting DIY-ers around the world.

Shut Up and Vibe: Racer Trash’s Movie Joyride

The Racer Trash film collective is dead, but its tire tracks remain streaked across the fringes of cinema.

Maximillian Alvarez on The Work of Living, COVID and The Unfathomable Loss of One Million Lives

"How can we quantify all that’s been stolen from us? How can we forgive the failures of our governments and our economic system whose callousness, greed, and jingoistic competitiveness made this all so much worse than it could have been?"

Jay Stephens On Their Creepy, Quirky, Demonic Comic Dwellings

We chat with Jay Stephens about small town mysteries, the gruesome side of Casper and their Doug Wright Award winning horror series Dwellings.

Folio: Joy Gough and Community Fridge Art

Folio asks artists and curators to gather works made with unexpected materials and adapt them for the printed page. In this issue, Joy Gough, one of the five organizers at Community Fridges TOronto tells us how how art can divert attention to dire local issues.

Review: The Butter Lamb News

The Butter Lamb News stakes out a delightfully bookish zine niche, championing print dictionaries over their digital conquerors, even while acknowledging the battle is lost.

Review: Nightlight

Like peanut butter and jelly, dream poems may not be the most innovative recipe, but the taste of the two together is often much richer than their reputation.

Review: Bad Apples

Bad Apples describes itself as an audiovisual zine, but it feels more like a street-level, sensory experience of Philly in crisis, as witnessed by Kara Khan and Matt Williams in the wake of George Floyd and the 2020 BLM protests.

Review: Swollening

The vulnerability in Swollening is best described as teeth being pulled, leaving you “jaw detached and tooth emptied.”

Review: MANIFEST (zine) #7

This water-themed issue of MANIFEST (zine) makes way for text and art contributions from a number of “friends and fellow creative spirits” who all lived near the Connecticut shoreline.

Review: Dumb-Show

Fawn Parker ridicules the academy and unchecked privilege. She also takes more than a few shots at poisonous celebrities along the way. The result is a truly glorious mash up of the academia of a novel like Lucky Jim and the medieval sand trap from the film The Duel.

Review: Notes

The form and name of the zine come from the out-of-the-box app Notes, available on Apple devices. It thoroughly assumes the clinical, sanitized trappings of Apple paraphernalia, with white glossy paper and rounded corners, like a manual found tucked inside a freshly-opened iPhone box.

Review: Behind the Zines: A Zine About Zines #13

The latest issue in this rewarding compilation mega/meta-zine offers several contributions that detail histories and origin stories of other zines.

Review: Hyperbolic Trajectories

Outer space, as both a place and a concept, holds a great deal of significance for each of the artists in this anthology. Characters reflect on lost possibilities; moments of intimacy or insecurity, including Soviet space dog Laika.

Review: SCRIED FUNDAMENTS

Bent by the crystal ball we’re peering into as much as by the off-kilter discourse of the person who’s speaking, MLA Chernoff's SCRIED FUNDAMENTS is is attention-grabbing, clever and regularly baffling.

Review: Death Threat

“Doesn’t being trolled on the internet go hand in hand with being feminine?” asks Vivek Shraya in Death Threat, an account of being harassed by a stranger in 2017.

Review: Out from the Void #4

Brenton Gicker is a registered nurse, a journalist, an EMT and a crisis worker — roles that, taken together, make him a witness to and testifier of struggle, injustice, disappearances and abuses of power among police.

Review: Your Very Own

Through erasure, removal and additions, John Nyman create their own rendition of a 1985 choose your own adventure novel. The narratives found through their erasure is one that supplants the somewhat stereotypical and white patriarchal norms that hang over many 80s Americana quests.

Review: The Adventures of Sgoobidoo

Zoinks! The Adventures of Sgoobidoo gives other hapless, cartoon canine paranormal detectives a run for their money.

How to Turn Your Zine Into a Video Game

Zinester and programmer v buckenham discusses Downpour, their latest creation, as well as flatgames, toolmaking and where indie games overlap with the zine scene.

One Last Trip Down Taddle Creek

Founded by Conan Tobias in 1997, Taddle Creek has flooded Canadians with fiction, features, comics and poetry. After 25 years the magazine is hanging up its beret.